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TONY ELUMELU AS NIGERIA’S ANDREW CARNEGIE — THE MAN WHO DIES THUS RICH; DIES DISGRACED – Andrew Carnegie

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The photograph above shows from left: Bill Gates, Tony Elumelu and Bill Clinton. This piece on TONY ELUMELU is in continuation of our publications on Nigerians whose conducts are worthy of emulation. The intention is to encourage others to follow good examples., hence the phrase: THE MAN WHO DIES THUS RICH; DIES DISGRACED – Andrew Carnegie That phrase seems very intriguing and at the same time, debatable, just as it is capable of several interpretations. But we will construe it to mean that we must embrace the culture of selflessness and allow the selfishness in us to die, for the common good of all. We could coordinate our personal interests for the benefit of the larger society.   ‘’The Gospel of Wealth’’ written by celebrated philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie is still as poignant, original, and pure as it was when it was published in 1889. Carnegie, wealthy American wrote what could be considered an everlasting treatise that delved into what he called: ‘’The Duties of A Man of Wealth’’ which states in part: ”First: to set an example of modest, unostentatious living, shunning display; to provide moderately for the legitimate wants of those dependent upon him, and after doing so, to consider all surplus revenues which come to him simply as trust funds, which he is strictly bound as a matter of duty, to administer in the manner which in his judgment is best calculated to produce the most beneficial results for the community. Carnegie was a man of great wisdom who probably lived ahead of his time. Just consider one of his assertions: ‘’Those who would administer wisely must indeed be wise. ”For one of the serious obstacles to the improvement of our race is indiscriminate charity. ‘’It were better for mankind that the millions of the rich were thrown into the sea than so spent as to encourage the slothful, the drunken, the unworthy. ‘’In bestowing charity, the main consideration should be to help those who help themselves. ‘’It provides part of the means by which those who desire to improve may do so; to give to those who desire to rise the aids by which they may rise; to assist but rarely or never to do all.’’ A content analysis of the speech delivered 130 years ago reveals that Carnegie never hid his disdain for slothfulness; and said so in clear and unmistakable terms: ‘’It were better for mankind that the…

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