Home Life & Times REMINISCENCES — HOW OLUBADAN AKINYELE, ALAYANDE, ADELABU & WURAOLA ESAN SHAPED EARLY...

REMINISCENCES — HOW OLUBADAN AKINYELE, ALAYANDE, ADELABU & WURAOLA ESAN SHAPED EARLY EDUCATION IN IBADAN —- S.T. ADELEGAN

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TERRIFIC HEADLINES in this edition, publishes a story from records its archives in recognition of the fact that a people with a history would definitely not be able to take stock of past events in order to understand situations in the present. History helps humanity to remember events of the past and shape the present and the future. Indeed, ‘’a people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots. — Marcus Garvey  Thirty (30) of us applied for the job of Education Secretary at Ibadan Divisional Council.  This was when Mr. J. M. Johnson was taking over the Chairmanship of the Council from Chief Adegoke Adelabu, who was then a Federal Minister, in Lagos. Ibadan Divisional Council was NCNC controlled.  Lekan Salami was a member of the Council (Councillor).  Other councillors were Muibi Akanbi and Alimi Adesokan, both of blessed memory.  I knew them all and they were kind.  Through them, I was able to know other prominent Ibadan indigenes. Our friendship had blossomed to a state that we did not give regard to nativity. This greatly helped me to secure the job among the 29 others mostly Ibadan indigenes who were also well qualified for the post. MERIT DETERMINED APPOINTMENTS: That was a period in Nigeria when place of origin never worked against competence and merit.  Not that alone, Mr. Owolabi Esan who was the Secretary of the Council gave preference to my candidature simply because I was working as a trainer of teachers, as a Graduate Tutor at the St, Luke’s Teachers Training College, Ibadan from 1951; young, vibrant, and versatile. Our office was at Mapo.  Shortly after I joined the service, it was observed that the staff strength had expanded as we were now having a larger organization.  We had to look elsewhere for office accommodation.  We were able to secure one at Oke-Ado, opposite the United Missionary College (UMC) Practicing School. The Mapo Office was now turned to a Library.  It was a wooden block directly under my supervision.  I had the inventory and record of everything there kept. Suddenly, we heard that the whole block was engulfed in fire and everything therein got burnt. What could have been the cause of fire accident in this type of office?  We asked ourselves.  Meanwhile, we did not occupy the block alone.  There was a treasury office there. I wrote the report of the incident and…

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