Home Governance CONFRONTING THE SCOURGE OF HUNGER, HUMAN & FOOD SECURITY IN AFRICA...

CONFRONTING THE SCOURGE OF HUNGER, HUMAN & FOOD SECURITY IN AFRICA — THE NEED FOR A QUICK A RETHINK —— THE MAN WHO DIES THUS RICH; DIES DISGRACED – Andrew Carnegie

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Every so often, I wonder why it has taken this long for Africa to free itself from the shackles of poverty, hunger, and development. On such occasions, I reasoned that there is no empirical proof that people of the developed world are more intelligent than those of us in the developing world. This assertion, if subjected to tests would most probably prove conclusively that Africans, nay Nigerian professionals in the Diaspora and students from Africa are more resilient and serious than their hosts who seem to have relaxed for us to dominate some sub-sectors of their national lives. Regrettably, we, in Africa, are still confronted with the problem of managing a plural community; plural in ethnicity, religion and culture in the face of diminishing economic resources. This factor is evidently the source of growing tension and conflict that plague the stability of nations. And the rest of the world cannot afford to sleep with two eyes closed in view of the implication of such to the peace of the whole world.  A few years ago, the United Nations approved about US$6.1 billion for the African Union Peace Keeping programme in eight out of the fifty-three African countries, stating that cost-effective and preventive measures were needed to enhance human security in the region and help establish conditions for sustainable economic development. FAMINE & CHRONIC HUNGER: The United Nations lacks the money to provide much-needed aid to millions of hungry people. Famines are acute food crises, usually after drought or due to armed conflict. Famine is the worst form of food shortage. In addition to old people, babies and small children are especially threatened by starvation. One of the worst hunger crises of the past 25 years was the famine in East Africa in 2011/12. In war-torn Somalia, 260,000 people starved to death, including 133,000 children under the age of five. Sub-Saharan Africa is also a hotbed of chronic hunger due to extreme poverty. According to the FAO definition, people suffer from chronic hunger if their daily energy intake for an extended period of time is below what they would need for a healthy and active life. According to the United Nations definition (Integrated Food Security Phase Classification), there is a famine if at least: 20% of households suffer from extreme food shortages, 30% of the population is acutely malnourished; and Two out of every 10,000 people, or four children, die daily from food shortages. THE COST OF INSECURITY & HUNGER: A…

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