Home Articles REMINISCENCES; THE BAD SIDES OF FIRST REPUBLIC POLITICS IN NIGERIA

REMINISCENCES; THE BAD SIDES OF FIRST REPUBLIC POLITICS IN NIGERIA

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There is apparently no human conduct that doesn’t have its bad sides. This must be so because human beings are not infallible. It is very pronounced in situations where ethics and cultures are involved. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2010) asserts that:‘’The ethics of a society is embedded in the ideas and beliefs about what is right or wrong, what is a good or bad character; it is also embedded in the conceptions of satisfactory social relations and attitudes held by the members of the society; it is embedded, furthermore, in the forms or patterns of behaviour that are considered by the members of the society to bring about social harmony and cooperative living, justice, and fairness. It is within the context of the foregoing that the bad sides of First Republic politics are being highlighted in this edition of REMINISCENCES from the collections of TERRIFIC HEADLINES. Please sit back, relax and enjoy the piece culled from: ‘The Part To Play: An Autobiography of Hon. S.T. Adelegan, Deputy Speaker; defunct Western Nigeria House of Assembly. Readers will most probably have one or two lessons to gain at a time that Nigerian youths are pushing for generational change in political governance.   PATRIOTISM Our children nowadays are not too enthusiastic about going home.  Some of them do not know their family land.  They should come home so that they don’t lose their inheritance.  I remember that despite the huge task of breaking the monopoly of the NCNC in my area, as the General Secretary of Action Group Party in Ijesa division, we never had it so rough to the extent of losing any member.  What characterized the political play then was campaigning with the use of drums – talking drums, in a band with the gong.  The drummer beats the drum sensationally to produce a lyric outpour of praises for the political leader; and in a case when the drummer wanted to use it to abuse political opponents, so the drum talked. The NCNC, led by Chief Odeleye Fadahunsi, moved about the whole division in this manner, spurred on by women who sang and danced with the chants – “Lawanson mo tun de o, Eru Omole, abagbon gbongbo’.  (meaning Lawanson, Omole’s slave has come again)Chief J.O. Lawanson, from Ere Ijesha was Action Group’s National Organizing Secretary. He had posed a big threat to the NCNC members, even before I came down home. …

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